QUALITY OF GREY WATER

ABSTRACT
Numerous settlement areas around urban and rural areas are plagued by lack of a
public sewer system. Hence, septic tanks are installed in which the wastewater is
discharged.
When the septic tank gets full, vacuum trucks are hired to empty it. However, this
becomes expensive if done frequently.
A good solution to avoid high maintenance costs for septic tanks, would be to separate
grey water from black water. The black water can be led into the septic tank.
The grey water can undergo primary treatment systems such as filtration and settling
tanks, disinfection and constructed wetlands. From here, this water can be re-used or
discharged into the environment through soak pits depending on the effluent quality.
Waste water from households include black water (discharge from toilets) and grey
water (discharge from kitchens and bathrooms). Grey water however constitutes the
greater proportion of total wastewater. Grey water makes up about 50-80% of total
wastewater.
Samples were collected from a block of flats in Ongata Rongai and the quality of the
grey water would then determine the manner in which the effluent would be handled.
The study begins with the introduction and objectives and the literature review
together with the theoretical frame work highlighted. The methodology, data
collected, results and analysis are discussed within. Finally, the conclusions and
relevant recommendations are made.

 

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NDUNG’U CHRIS KIMANGA.pdf1.48 MB